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traditional PR firm.

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More than a
traditional PR firm.

More than a traditional PR firm.

Innovative Calls to Action

Post by Liz Giorgi. Liz is a Senior Account Executive at Himle Rapp. You can follow her on Twitter: @lizgiorgi.

For those who write a lot of CTA (call to action) copy for grassroots messages, this formula is all too familiar. And it can get pretty redundant:

 

It’s not for lack of imagination that most supporter messages follow this formula. It’s because data shows it works. Creating urgency helps to get people to act now, which is the whole point. BUT, the truth is that this combination gets overused and by the time you REALLY need them, your supporter base has grown weary of these kinds of messages.

Think of it practically from a recipient’s perspective: how can everything be URGENT every time? Wasn’t the last message “the make or break moment?” Wasn’t the last appeal our “final chance at success?” We as creators and email strategists set up a false narrative by trying to appeal to this sense of urgency every single time, instead of placing a bet on our supporters that they’ll take the action even if we aren’t so over the top. 

Here’s a couple new formulas we’re trying out:

People relate to other people. Don’t be afraid to use a personal appeal to draw others in. Then, give your supporters an option. For example, ask them to take action on a specific item AND/OR retweet another supporter’s message. Better yet, ask them to retweet something from the person who just shared their story and make it easy for the user to do so by using a tool like Click to Tweet.

Another truth about people: they like to be asked what they think. This formula gives them something to talk about, while still asking them to take action. Share a video about your cause with them, ask them what they think and if they would share it with their network. Instead of defining the messaging, you give the supporter the opportunity to relate it to his or her own experience – all while hopefully expanding your supporter base.

It’s a simple lesson, but before you send out your next CTA, think about this: would I take action? If the answers no, consider a change in your formula. 

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